Saturday, September 7, 2013

Around the Web


17th-19th Century Native American Wardrobe

Jessica Diemer-Eaton is a historical interpreter and owner of Woodland Indian Educational Programs (WIEP). She conducts public programs on historical Northeastern Native American lifeways for museums, Powwows, historical reenactments, cultural centers, and schools. WIEP provides interpretive workshops for museum docents and guides, illustrations for educational publications, and free worksheets and coloring pages downloads for classroom use (limited permissions for teachers).

I created this page to address the questions I usually get regarding the historic period clothing I wear for my job. I am a historical interpreter (museum trained) who conducts programs about historic Native life-ways, and demonstrations of historic Woodland Indian daily activities for museums, powwows, cultural centers, and living history events (www.WoodlandIndianEDU.com). I have been doing this and related cultural/historical awareness projects and programming for over 10 years.

Strap Dress

Leggings
A Garment with Time-Specific Design

1600's white trade shirt, stained with red pigment and decorated with silver ring broaches

The Wrap Skirt

Visit Jessica's page on Squidoo for her discussion on each of her outfits as well as information on moccasins, finger weaving, the native hood, nose rings on women, shoulder bags and pouches as well as a wealth of other information.

Copy and photos from My 17th-19th Century Native American Wardrobe.

4 comments:

  1. Thank you. This looks like a wonderful reference for folks like me, trying to learn. I'm following up the links.

    ReplyDelete
  2. There is a lot of good information on Jessica's site.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Unfortunately, there is a lot of incredibly confusing information: silver ring broaches on a 17th century shirt? Women painting the shoulders red? Bags associated with warriors being worn by a woman? Sashes? Where is the real evidence?

    ReplyDelete
  4. It's nice to see something about natives, done by a native. Instead of stupid old white guys.

    ReplyDelete